Wroot or Wroote, as it has sometimes been written, stands isolated at the edge of the Isle. Not so isolated as when it was an island, but still a little out of the way even today. The word Wroot, Stonehouse says translates as "out of England" and so it may well have appeared in time past. It stands on rising ground, now surrounded by flat fields and famous in past days for rhubarb and celery growing. Before the drainage it could only be reached by boat or swamp shoes!

In a deed of Roger de Mowbray early in the reign of Henry II he left all his possessions at Wroot to God and the monks of St. Mary at York. In 1411 Hugo de Waterton, Lord of the Manor of Wroot married Ellen, daughter of Robert Mowbray. It was confiscated by Henry VIII and later Charles II sold it to Vermuyden. Later the property passed into the hands of the Harvey family.

The church of St. Pancras was rebuilt in 1794 and again in 1879 and incorporates portions of the 14C church. The latest church is of brick with a small tower at one side. John Whitelanb, who is buried in the churchyard was recommended to Samuel Wesley. He married his daughter, Mary, and later became Vicar of Wroot. John Wesley was curate at Wroot for two years from 1728, his father Samuel holding both Wroot and Epworth as his living.

Henry Travis left land to endow three Free Schools at Hatfield, Thorne and Wroote. Both John Whitelamb and John Wesley taught in the school. The pupils were taught "to read English, the Bible and the Catechism" and when they left at 17 (very late!) they were given a Bible, a Prayer Book and a book entitled "The Whole Duty of Man".

The registers date from 1573 but are not a full set, as during Cromwell's reign, many children went unbaptised. The registers are still in the hands of the Rector of Epworth today, and some years ago the Parish Chest was broken into and the burial registers taken. The Rector has to be consulted to see the Wroot and Epworth registers.

Old Wroot names are Fotheringham, Holgate, Kynman, Maw and Waisnedge.


The Parishes of the Isle of Axholme
WROOT
(Wroth)
Wroot Methodist Chapel
 
Isle of Axholme Family History Society Copyright 2007
Copyright 2007 Isle of Axholme Family History Society. All Rights Reserved.